Preface: For all those times people have made puns out of our last name, it’s our turn.

Today was a good day. We spent the majority of it painting rooms in the Kenyatta National Hospital. Afterwards, we were priveleged enough to meet with and hear stories from both members of our team and Kenyan cancer advocates. It left many of the people present with a feeling of empowerment, but we particularly felt a feeling of retrospection.

“If you want to make others happy, practice compassion. If you want to make yourself happy, practice compassion.” -Dalai Lama

Now, compassion has a rather deep definition that is often overlooked. To be compassionate literally means “to suffer with.” After discussing the day’s happenings, we both couldn’t help pondering the acts of compassion our family has shown to people living with brokenness, and how the Lord has lead us to a place of peace and contentment. Growing up in the Little family has been a seemingly large task of learning to practice compassion both in our own home and in our community. Our parents tirelessly encourage the words of Jesus when He spoke the beattitudes.

He said:

3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
4 Blessed are those who mourn,
for they will be comforted.
5 Blessed are the meek,
for they will inherit the earth.
6 Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness,
for they will be filled.
7 Blessed are the merciful,
for they will be shown mercy.
8 Blessed are the pure in heart,
for they will see God.
9 Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they will be called children of God.
10 Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”

The Beattitudes essentially demonstrate both the sacrifices and the fruits of being conpassionate. We along with our siblings have been given similar instructions of how to be present in times of need and how to practice compassion with “Little” steps.

  1. We seek to mirror the example of Christ.
  2. We view hardwork in service to each other as demonstrations of love.
  3. We see the most precious commodity that we can give to someone as our time.
  4. We strive to devote our talents, knowledge and resources to those in need of them.
  5. And we repeatedly call each other to practice those beliefs.

It’s something so simple, yet so challenging, because we are asked to give what we have. Nothing more and nothing less.

Now when the time comes for our family to suffer specifically with each other in times of tribulation, such as a cancer diagnosis, we equally bear the burden of the heartache.

“None of us are as strong as all of us.” -Dr. Richard Deming

It was not more one person’s battle than it was another’s. We all dealt with emotions, weariness and suffering and rejoiced in every “Little” victory.

With the mission of Above and Beyond Cancer, we have been privileged to witness this revelation first-hand among the teamwork we displayed today and in the continous interaction with other members of the team. We have shared in each other’s suffering and reaped the harvest of joy after the hardwork.

So as we walk through the rest of whatever this life brings, we will stand with compassion… Little by Little.

Now when the time comes for our family to suffer specifically with each other in times of tribulation, such as a cancer diagnosis, we equally bear the burden of the heartache.

“None of us are as strong as all of us.” -Dr. Richard Deming

It was not more one person’s battle than it was another’s. We all dealt with emotions, weariness and suffering and rejoiced in every “Little” victory.

With the mission of Above and Beyond Cancer, we have been privileged to witness this revelation first-hand among the teamwork we displayed today and in the continous interaction with other members of the team. We have shared in each other’s suffering and reaped the harvest of joy after the hardwork.

So as we walk through the rest of whatever this life brings, we will stand with compassion… Little by Little.

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